The driver shortage is so bad, that electric car maker Tesla is unveiling this next week: An electric semi-truck that may be autonomous and operate without a driver.

We depend on them to ship supplies across the country, but the trucking industry faces retiring baby boomers and a struggle to recruit new Millennials.

The driver shortage is so bad, that electric car maker Tesla is unveiling this next week: an electric semi-truck that may be autonomous and operate without a driver.

"Realistically trucks get a bad rap because there’s so many on the road, and they’re so many hours, but people just don’t know how to drive anymore," says Mark Sayetta, trucker.

When Mark Sayetta heard about the pay and the benefits of driving trucks, he decided to give it a try. He thought it would be challenging and give him an opportunity to travel. But after four months, he's discouraged about it.

"It’s not an easy job, it’s a fun job," he says. "But you have to be the right person. If you’ve got family, if you’ve got kids it can be hard on you."

Sayetta worries about accidents, 14 hour days and aging parents. He's thinking about getting out. He's not alone. Some companies are seeing as much as a 74 percent turnover each year.

"It’s actually been good for me," says Ben Landis, Washington State resident. "I was homeless before -- it just seemed like a good fit."

Ben Landis says trucking has been good to him. He says drivers can make good money as much as $1,500 a week. Landis says he doesn't see any indication that a shortage looms.

"When I go to a truck stop there are hundreds of trucks waiting, parked for the night," says Landis. "It all depends on the company too... A lot of companies have a lot of turnover because they're not good companies to work for."