A man named Pabos came to what is now the town of Victor in 1618, making him the earliest known European visitor to the area.
The town of Victor recently commemorated the 400th anniversary of this visit at the Pabos monument by Irondequoit Creek on Wangum Road, next to Fishers Park.
George Selden, an historical researcher, determined that Pabos was a Basque explorer from Europe who sailed up the St. Lawrence River in quest of the Northwest Passage. Irondequoit Creek evidently was a candidate of routes to explore. Pabos died during this expedition.
This information was found in response to a small stone tablet found in 1907 in Fishers by Lou Crowley, of Victor, who was working for the Locke Insulator Co.
Fred Locke was working as a railroad telegrapher in Fishers when he invented the porcelain insulator. He manufactured the early insulator prototypes in Fishers, which had clay deposits suitable for baking. The particular load of clay was being delivered to the insulator plant in the village of Victor when Locke spotted this small stone.
The small tablet, which measured approximately 4-by-5-inches, read “Pabos, IYIM, June 10, 1618.” The phrase “IYIM” was translated to “At home with Jesus in death,” indicating its use as a grave marker.
Historian J. Sheldon Fisher consulted with Crowley in 1959 to record his recollection of the 1907 discovery. Fisher constructed the stone pyramidal monument about 300 feet west of the clay field site where Crowley said he found the original marker.
Selden, an amateur archaeologist and friend of Fisher, researched the history that is memorialized in the plaque on the pyramid monument. Selden spent many years research researching the influence of the French in New York. He was the last living charter member of the New York State Archaeological Association.