A more effective education system, more reliable infrastructures, and more sensible taxes are the promises made by Cal 3, which is the group getting the vote on the ballot in California to split the state into three regions.

A more effective education system, more reliable infrastructures, and more sensible taxes are the promises made by Cal 3, which is the group getting the vote on the ballot in California to split the state into three regions.

Here in New York, we have a group called the Divide New York Caucus who are proposing a similar idea where Upstate New York would have its own government.

"I went on vacation and you say you're from New York, they automatically think NYC," stated Cassie Mcguire, voter.

It's a common misconception in which people are picturing the entirety of the state lit up like Times Square.

"My backyard is a cornfield, and you never see public transportation around there."

Different parts of the state have different needs but the majority of our state's population lives in and around New York City, which often drives our state-wide laws.

"We have a different economy, different businesses, their issues are different from the ones we face here," stated Megan Kale, voter.

Which is why voters would be open to looking at a similar split to what California will be voting on. The split promises to lower taxes, a sentiment echoed here on the east coast.

"We pay a lot of taxes for the New York City people.... they have more people there who probably don't have the income, their cost of living is extra high, so we have to subsidize them," stated Kale.

The Rockefeller Institute looked into that very concept by putting together a study on where your taxes go and where your state expenditures come from.

The study found the opposite of public opinion, that in fact New York City and downstate suburbs give far more money to Albany in taxes than they get in return.

More specifically, the study found that money often flows upstate. About three-quarters of state transportation money is sent upstate and 73 percent of state money funds the SUNY system. It also found that approximately 55 percent of state money that is spent on capital projects is spent upstate. This would mean that a split from downstate would cost us that money.

Voters here in Rochester say they'll be paying attention to what California voters decide to do and if it benefits them to split up into separate regions. If voters pass the idea, it will have to be approved by Congress.