The photo editors of Minor League Baseball have deemed it one of the top twelve photos captured during the 2015 season. Fans will decide if it’s the best photo of the year by voting on Minor League Baseball’s official website, www. milb.com. Voting ends on October 27.

Submitted to The Post

It’s almost painful to look at. A picture of Major League Baseball’s top prospect, Byron Buxton, crashing into the center field wall at Frontier Field. The photo was made by Greece resident and Rochester Red Wings team photographer, Joe Territo during a game on August 16. The photo editors of Minor League Baseball have deemed it one of the top twelve photos captured during the 2015 season. Fans will decide if it’s the best photo of the year by voting on Minor League Baseball’s official website, www. milb.com. Voting ends on October 27.

“I’m thrilled just to be nominated” said the long time professional photographer. “I knew I had captured a cool picture but then I noticed that his sunglasses had popped off and were suspended in mid air along with his hat on this particular frame. I think that gives it a little extra wow factor.”

Territo said that the speedy centerfielder wasn’t slowing down as he approached the wall on his failed attempt at catching the ball. “I thought to myself that we all had waited so long to finally see Byron Buxton in a Red Wings uniform and now he’s headed for the disabled list.” But to the relief of the team trainer, staff and fans, the future superstar got up from the ground slowly and remained in the game.

Joe Territo began his photography career as a team photographer for the Rochester Amerks in the 1980s. He has been involved in many areas of photography over the years including medical photography where he has won numerous awards and has been published in several medical journals. In addition to his work with the Red Wings, he is also employed at Retina Associates of Western New York where he specializes in photographing diseases of the eye for diagnostic purposes. He is also an adjunct professor of ophthalmic photography at Rochester Institute of Technology and frequently travels the country lecturing on the subject as well. “I often joke with my patients that I photograph eyeballs during the day and baseballs at night” he says.

“Being part of a team dedicated to preserving vision is rewarding”, Territo said of his work in ophthalmology, “but shooting the action on a baseball diamond is just plain fun.”