The Center for Urban Education Success at University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education will host “All In: When Theory Meets Practice in Education Reform” from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 28 at East Upper and Lower Schools, 1801 E. Main St., Rochester.
Schools are the center of the community. When schools are transformed in positive ways, communities are transformed. The symposium on school reform will highlight the transformational work of the UR-East Educational Partnership Organization. As part of the EPO established in July 2015, UR assumed management responsibilities for East, a Rochester city school that includes grades 6-12.
The program will feature three 50-minute sessions and two plenary addresses. East teachers, administrators and community partners will lead attendees through presentations that link educational theory to practice in the evolution of a school-based reform initiative. Sessions will encourage dialogue among presenters and attendees.
“Everyone is welcome to actively participate in this symposium, whether as an educator, community partner, parent, student or someone who simply believes in education,” said Shaun Nelms, East EPO superintendent and associate professor at the Warner School. “The symposium will promote the vision of this unique university partnership and provide an opportunity to share our accomplishments with the broader community.”
Symposium guests can choose three sessions to attend during the daylong symposium. Topics include curriculum and support, teacher practices and decisions, social-emotional health, family and community engagement, university partnerships and fostering school communities.
CUES launched the symposium series in 2017 with scholar and school reform expert Pedro Noguera, distinguished professor of education at UCLA, as its keynote speaker.
Registration is required for the free event by April 15. Doors will open at 8 a.m. Refreshments and a light lunch will be provided. Call (585) 324-3651 or email catherine.wilson@rcsdk12.org to request special accommodations.
Call (585) 210-9754 or visit urcues.org for information.