This week, I am continuing my series on taking a walk down one of the villages main streets in 1950.
Today, I am visiting the south side of the 100 block of West Commercial Street.
Starting near the four corners we come to Simmon’s Florist a competitor to Koon’s Florist that used to be on Filbert Place. Next was Kay’s Children’s Center. Following that was the Town Dry Cleaners run by Dick Morabito, which suffered major fire damage a few years later. Then came Tom Furfare’s Cigar Store. After that was Louis Cinelli’s Brush Inn Restaurant. Dominic Calabrese operated his Terminal Liquor Store next to the restaurant.
Then there was Mike Berretone’s Smoke Shop. It was more of a variety store. Mike’s wife was a sister to the owners of Sweetland across the street. Then came Tando’s Chop House, run by Mike Tando; before that, it was called O’Learys and Kreyers. Next was a store you don’t see too often now, a shoe repair shop run by Cosmo (Crash) Goodman. Next Jack Tobin, Carl Corea and others managed a branch store of the Rochester Gas and Electric which sold major appliances at that time.
Let’s take a break in the alley that was next on the walk.
Then came Danny’s Pool Parlor, a favorite hangout of high school boys of the day. Mauros Hotel came next and then again something you don’t see in the village now was another vacant lot. Hatch’s Music Store was after the lot and next door was John Speca’s Bowling Alley. Mike Prince ran Rose’s Restaurant which came after the bowling hall. The restaurant was named after his wife who was the mother of Dick Prince who was co-owner with George Kuhn of PG’s on the corner of Main and Maple. Tom Parrotta’s Photo Studio followed, he was best known as the photographer who took most of the photos at the local school, especially the senior yearbook portraits. Joe Guarino’s Gift Shop was the last on my tour of the south side of the street.
These businesses are gone now a result of the urban renewal program of the early 1970s. All the photos I use in these articles are available on our website erhistory.com and at our office on the second floor of the Eyer Building. Stop in and see us sometime.
Next week, I will go back down on the north side of the street.