Seneca Park Zoo announced the arrival of a male snowy owl named Tundra, who will join female snowy owl Winter in an expanded and improved habitat outside the Rocky Coasts Gallery.
The 6-year-old owl comes from the National Aviary in Pittsburgh. Unlike Winter, Tundra is able to fly. He was confiscated by the Pennsylvania Game Commission from a private citizen in 2014. Since he was imprinted on humans, he was deemed unable to be re-released.
“Tundra’s story gives us a great opportunity to educate the public about the perils of having endangered animals as pets,” said Pamela Reed Sanchez, president and CEO of the Seneca Park Zoo Society. “That said, it’s great for guests to be able to see these amazing animals so close.”
The snowy owl habitat was renovated to be fully enclosed, and includes new perches and a new shelter area. It was closed for several months for the improvements.
“The netting allows the snowy owls to remain outside overnight while affording them protection from predators,” said David Hamilton, acting zoo director. “It also allows us to hold flighted owls that we couldn’t before. This new habitat will hopefully allow us to breed the snowy owls as well. Tundra and Winter have already gone through an introduction period and seem to be very compatible.”
Through March 31, the zoo is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Last entry is at 3 p.m. The zoo is offering Free Youth February. For every adult who purchases an admissions ticket in February, up to five youth guests ages 3-11 can join them for free. Children ages 2 and younger are always free.