Webster voters have a choice for Town Justice when they go to the polls Nov. 8. Incumbent Judge David T. Corretore, first elected in 1988, is seeking reelection. This year, he is facing a challenge from attorney Jim Harrison.

Webster voters have a choice for Town Justice when they go to the polls Nov. 8.

Incumbent Judge David T. Corretore, first elected in 1988, is seeking reelection.

This year, he is facing a challenge from attorney Jim Harrison.

The Post asked each of the candidates to provide biographical information and the answers to the same three questions. Their answers, in alphabetical order, follow.

The Hon. David T. Corretore
OCCUPATION: Attorney in Webster; Webster Town Justice
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Member, United Methodist Church of Webster; member, Webster Chamber of Commerce.
FAMILY: Wife, Kelly; two children: Jennifer and Stephanie; one grandchild, Rachel
HOBBIES AND INTERESTS: “Keeping the house, yard and garden up, in between family duties. Making a run to see my granddaughter whenever I can. Thinking about how to stretch a dollar farther than ever before.”
AGE: 53
BALLOT LINES: Republican, Conservative, Independence

What is your definition of a public servant, or your philosophy of public service?
“According to Webster’s Dictionary, a public servant is defined as “an elected … government official.”  Given that the residents of the Town of Webster have elected me six times as a Webster Town Justice, apparently I technically qualify for such a title, but I see my public service as more than just meeting this definition. I think that public service is a matter of joyfully playing an active role in our governmental system. As a judge in my hometown, it has been my honor to do my part in keeping Webster a town I personally love to live and work in.”

What specific experience, either professional or personal, do you have that would uniquely inform you as you tackle the duties of the elective office you are seeking?
“My 24 years as Webster Town Justice have been a proving ground to that which I thought I was bringing to this position when I started. As an attorney, I had a solid legal background that I believed well qualified me for the position. I took Justice Jack VanIngen’s words to heart when he told me that I should run for Webster Town Justice when he retired after 30-plus years on the bench. The mandatory training, and training by fire, that I have undergone each of my years on the bench further well qualifies me.”

What do you think is the single biggest issue facing Webster in the next two to four years?
“The single biggest issue facing Webster courts in the next two to four years might be some new piece of state legislation, regulation, ruling or administration directive that has some widespread, significant, yet unintended, consequence to our court. I know of no such thing, but from time to time such things happen. Without some catastrophic surprise, I would say that Webster Town Court will continue to have a very smoothly run court with judges, clerks, automation and a building that allow us to fairly and efficiently handle the approximately 6,500 cases that come into our court in a given year.”


***

Jim Harrison
OCCUPATION: Attorney
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Coached and/or volunteered in many youth sports programs, including Webster Jr. Warriors/Titans Football, WAA softball, Webster Bluefins and Webster Presidential Soccer; member, St. Rita’s Church
FAMILY: Wife, Susan; children: Mallory and Russell
HOBBIES AND INTERESTS: Travel, cooking, movies, music, golf, bicycling, reading
AGE: 43
BALLOT LINE: Democrat

What is your definition of a public servant, or your philosophy of public service?
“First and foremost, each individual must be committed to the public good. In other words, every action undertaken by a public servant must be done so responsibly, morally and ethically, with the vision and desire to further the goal of making life better for everybody in our community. Sometimes this will require sacrifice, many times it will involve compromise, and most times it will necessitate collaboration.  But if each individual public servant always acts in this manner, then the end result is a government which, as a whole, is truly working toward the good of the public.     

What specific experience, either professional or personal, do you have that  would uniquely inform you as you tackled the duties of the elective office you are seeking?
“I have been practicing law in Rochester for nearly 20 years, and usually find myself in a courtroom at least several times a week. Further, as owner of The Harrison Law Office, I have learned how to profitably operate my business in an efficient and economical manner. But perhaps most importantly, I like to think that my peers, including those who oppose me in the courtroom, view me as an honest, fair and moral person with a high level of integrity. These are the traits I will carry with me to the bench, if I am elected Town Justice.”

What do you think is the single biggest issue facing Webster in the next two to four years?
“Along with so many other communities today, budgetary needs are the number one concern we will encounter over the next several years. Many, if not all, of the conversations I have had with Webster residents as I have been walking door-to-door have essentially boiled down to money issues. If I am elected Town Justice, I will make every effort to operate the Webster Justice Court in a most efficient and expeditious manner, while still guaranteeing each resident his or her right to be heard fully, fairly and impartially.”