Two candidates are running for two positions on the Henrietta Town Board.

Two candidates are running for two positions on the Henrietta Town Board.

Here’s more about each candidate (in alphabetic order):

Name: William J. Mulligan, Jr.
Party lines: Republican, Conservative and Independence
Hometown: Henrietta
Age: 59
Family: Wife, Susan, and sons, William & Michael, both students at St.
Bonaventure
Occupation: Genesee Valley Regional Market Authority Administrator since
1987
Organizations/affiliations: 
National Association of Produce Market Managers
(NAPMM), former President; Henrietta Chamber of Commerce member & former
President; Board member of Holy Sepulchre Cemetery.

Why are you running for town board?
Town Board is the government closest to the people. As a Board member,
you have input into the tax rate, building development and how services are
delivered. Many times you are able to help residents with issues they have
with the Town.

What's the most important issue facing Henrietta residents in the next few
years?
Healthcare and pension costs are increasing dramatically. We need to control those better. Many neighborhoods are negatively impacted by student housing. We need to better protect the integrity of the neighborhoods.

Name: M. Rick Page
Party lines: Republican, Conservative and Independence
Current residence: Henrietta
Age: 66
Family: Wife, Sharon; married adult children: Michael, Shelby and Shana
Occupation: Retired teacher, coach and educational administrator
Organizations/affiliations:
Henrietta Planning Board, Henrietta Youth Board, Monroe County Youth Board-Vice Chair, Henrietta Foundation, Executive South Golf and Family Center Board of Management, Eucharistic Minister Henrietta Catholic Community and Henrietta Chamber of Commerce.

Why are you running for town board?
I have a long history of service to this community I love and becoming a Town Councilman would be the highlight of my being able to "give back!"

What's the most important issue facing Henrietta residents in the next few years? 
As with most communities in New York State, maintaining low taxes and upholding high levels of service in the face of tax caps, significant increases in medical and retirement costs with no reductions in unfunded State mandates.